Hubble observes a little-known spiral galaxy| Trending Viral hub

Using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have captured a stunning photograph of the spiral galaxy UGC 11105.

This Hubble image shows UGC 11105, a spiral galaxy about 110 million light years away in the constellation Hercules.  Image credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble/RJ Foley, UC Santa Cruz.

This Hubble image shows UGC 11105, a spiral galaxy about 110 million light years away in the constellation Hercules. Image credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble/RJ Foley, UC Santa Cruz.

CGU 11105 It is located approximately 110 million light years away in the constellation Hercules.

Also known as LEDA 61361 or TC 578, this spiral galaxy is home to an active galactic nucleus, a supermassive black hole that attracts large amounts of matter from its surroundings.

The type II supernova SN 2019pjswhich occurred at UGC 11105 in 2019, although it is no longer visible in this image, it definitely eclipsed the galaxy at that time.

“To be more precise, UGC 11105 has an apparent magnitude of about 13.6 in the optical light regime,” the Hubble astronomers said.

Astronomers have different ways of quantifying the brightness of celestial objects, and apparent magnitude is one of them.

“First, the ‘apparent’ part of this quantity refers to the fact that apparent magnitude only describes how bright objects appear to be from Earth, which is not the same as measuring how bright they actually are.” , the researchers explained.

“For example, actually the variable star Betelgeuse It is about 21,000 times brighter than our Sun, but because the Sun is much, much closer to Earth, Betelgeuse appears to be much dimmer than it.”

“The ‘magnitude’ part is a little harder to describe, because the magnitude scale has no unit associated with it, unlike, say, mass, which we measure in kilograms, or length, which we measure in meters.” .

“Magnitude values ​​only have meaning in relation to other magnitude values.”

“In addition, the scale is not linear, but is a type of mathematical scale known as ‘inverse logarithmic,’ which also means that objects of lower magnitude are brighter than those of higher magnitude.”

“As an example, UGC 11105 has an apparent magnitude of about 13.6 optically, while the Sun has an apparent magnitude of about -26.8.”

“Taking into account the inverse logarithmic scale, this means that the Sun appears to be about 14,000 billion times brighter than UGC 11105 from our perspective here on Earth, even though UGC 11105 is an entire galaxy!”

“The faintest stars that humans can see with the naked eye are around sixth magnitude, and most galaxies are much fainter than this one.”

“However, Hubble is known to detect objects with apparent magnitudes up to the extraordinary value of 31, so UGC 11105 doesn’t really present much of a challenge.”

This color image of UGC 11105 was obtained with Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument.

The image combines observations gathered in two different filters, gathering visible and near-infrared light.

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